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Fill Riffs with the 5th Position G Minor Pentatonic Scale

Lesson 4 – Rhythm Fill Riffs and Lead Guitar Course
Lesson ID: A0092

Up to this point, we’ve studied how you can use the 5th position major scale notes to create country and bluegrass riffs. Next, to make your riffs sound even more country, you need to mix in the 5th position G minor pentatonic scale. In this lesson video, we’re going to learn the 5th position of the G minor pentatonic scale and I’ll show you how to use it with your fill riffs and chord embellishments. In my opinion, the 5th position of the G minor pentatonic scale is the second most important position of the pentatonic scales when you’re playing country and bluegrass.

Lesson Video

Video Start Time Lesson Topic
00:00 min Lesson Overview
02:16 min Scale Chart Breakdown
10:04 min Switching Between Major & Minor Pentatonics
14:21 min 5th Position G Minor Pentatonic Scale
16:33 min “Man of Constant Sorrow” Fill Riffs

Scale Charts

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37 Comments
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Ron
Ron (@guest_345)
5 years ago

Really great job explaining everything. This is exactly what I’m interested in learning right now. Glad I found your site!

Kyle
Kyle (@guest_347)
5 years ago

I hope you keep adding more videos to this course!! This is really good stuff. Very good teaching and I like this style a lot. I’ve learned more the past few days with your videos than I have in a long time.

Tim Miller
Tim Miller(@tim)
5 years ago

I’m still loving this series you’re working on. Keep it up!!

Carl Phillips
Carl Phillips (@guest_575)
5 years ago

Thanks for your lessons, love the way you teach ??

gazfootpodiatry
gazfootpodiatry(@gazfootpodiatryyahoo-co-uk)
5 years ago

Isn’t the lick at 13:55 based on the blues scale ?c# to c not minor pentatonic ?

Devin
Devin (@guest_699)
5 years ago

Yep there are some blues scale notes mixed in there…that little run is just to give some high level examples of the difference between the major pentatonic sound vs. the minor pentatonic sound. Later in the series we’ll go over the blues scale and tie it all together. Since the blues scale is basically the minor pentatonic scale with one extra note added per octave, not too much difference between the blues scale and minor pentatonic sound. Thanks for the comment…hope you’re enjoying the lessons! – Devin

gazfootpodiatry
gazfootpodiatry(@gazfootpodiatryyahoo-co-uk)
5 years ago
Reply to  Devin

I should of watched your next video first . Just thought I would mention it as it may confuse a newbie . Sorry to be so pedantic.
Yes Even though I’ve been playing a while, It good to go back over old ground as you’ll always learn stuff or look at things in a different way from someone else’s perspective .
The layout Of your site I’m most impressed with. Good stuff .

g Jones
g Jones(@gazfootpodiatryyahoo-co-uk)
5 years ago
Reply to  Devin

Yes. It’s my only endeavour at Luthery . I was aiming for a vintage kind of look . In the style of a violin. So it’s got the lipped edges like a violin . It’s not too bad to look at but more importantly it plays nice and has a good bluegrass sound.

g Jones
g Jones (@guest_708)
5 years ago
Reply to  Devin

I think I picked one of the hardest instruments to make (talk about jumping in the deep end ) I have never made anything before like this, few cupboards in my van that’s about it . Carving the front and back was the hardest on your hands . Bending sides trickiest . I used a book . Siminoff . Mandolin construction and YouTube videos . It was very hit and miss to be honest just got lucky . I’m no luthier but it does give you greatest respect for real luthiers once you try it yourself . But like anything… Read more »

g Jones
g Jones (@guest_713)
5 years ago
Reply to  Devin

Yes total build from planks of tone wood .

daniel_to_b
daniel_to_b(@daniel_to_bhotmail-com)
4 years ago

Devin, I am immensely grateful. Your teaching method is excellent, and for the first time I am actually getting closer to being able to sing and play at the same time. Still not as smooth as I would like, but there are moments where the rhythm takes over and everything feels natural (I never felt that before, so THANK YOU!) I still miss the occasional alternate bass string, but I feel that I am getting there.

joe.wallau
joe.wallau(@joe-wallaugmail-com)
4 years ago

Great stuff, Devin. Glad I joined. Note: Before signing up, I asked if you were going to do a lesson of fill riffs in the key of C. Now that I am into this, I see there is no need. Simply learn these scales in whatever key you want and GO.
Thanks for this enterprise. You are helping folks enjoy.

Greg
Greg (@guest_1145)
4 years ago

Just came across one of ur lessons on YouTube then went to web page, really good explanations of how to play guitar. Thanks so much, I’ve been looking for this level of instruction for about a year

tesorieroj
tesorieroj(@tesorierojgmail-com)
4 years ago

your lessons are so well done and helpful! I have to tell you that ive been looking for books or online lessons etc for soloing or improvisation and the teachers play the music so well, but never show tabs so that the student can practice the same riffs ! when youask them to show the riffs and tabs all they say is” its improve and the purpose is for you to use your imagination” very frustrating! I love your lessons and will sign up for longer period! thankyou sir!!!

James J Wood
James J Wood(@james-jax-woodxtra-co-nz)
4 years ago

Man Of Constant Sorrow type Fiffs Are very useful thanks so much James J

jscottphelps
jscottphelps(@jscottphelpsgmail-com)
4 years ago

Hello Devin- I wanted to take a quick minute, introduce myself, and say thank you for your lessons. I’ve been playing guitar for a lot of years, I put my time in, and consider myself a fairly competent guitar picker. However, I’m still missing a lot of pieces to the whole puzzle. I signed up back in January and have throughly and slowly been making my way through the strumming and lead courses. There is some tremendously useful information in both of those courses. One area that I knew I needed some improvement in was with scales. I’ve messed around… Read more »

rdel5757
rdel5757(@rdel5757aol-com)
4 years ago

Devin,

Loving your lessons! Just out of curiouity, since this is a G minor pentatonic scale, why do you start the scale on the 6th string first fret and not the 6th sting 3rd fret?

Thanks!

rdel5757
rdel5757(@rdel5757aol-com)
4 years ago
Reply to  Devin

Got it! Thank you!

bachplay6
bachplay6(@bachplay6gmail-com)
3 years ago

great lesson on mixing minor and major.

cassarta11
cassarta11(@cassarta11gmail-com)
3 years ago

Most of the Time it is G C D .. is there another chord suiting in this pack of 3 chords

David
David(@davidhunter1947gmail-com)
3 years ago

Devin – how do you get your speed up to where you are playing on the video. Sometimes you cannot tell one eight note from the other eight note.
Do you have a practice regime that you can recommend?

mr.chuffey
mr.chuffey(@mr-chuffeyhotmail-com)
3 years ago

Great lessons, Devon. One thing I don’t get so far – position 1 starts on the first note of the G scale on the low E string, position 2 starts on the second note of the G scale, position 3 starts on the third note, but then position 4 starts on the fifth note of the scale, and position 5 starts on the 6th note of the scale. Is there any reason to try to make sense of how the “positions” are numbered? Just trying to soak in the best way to remember all this stuff.

mr.chuffey
mr.chuffey(@mr-chuffeyhotmail-com)
3 years ago
Reply to  mr.chuffey

Thanks Devin, I’ll check all this out….

bobbyperales
bobbyperales(@bobbyperalesyahoo-com)
3 years ago

Devin,

I just join a few days ago. Just watching these first videos in this series has done so much for me already. I have been trying to teach myself guitar for decades. I have bought tons of books and have seen these pentatonic scales put in front of me numerous times. But none have made it applicable like you have in just these first few videos. Thank you so much for putting this material out here.

Bobby

Scott Morrow
Scott Morrow(@morrow1616)
2 years ago

Devin, I am a recent member, and I really like the way that you developed the courses to build on each other. Not too fast, but challenging (to a beginner at this). I am looking forward to getting to the point that I actually get it and muscle memory takes over- I know that is a long ways off, but with the structured steps I do believe it will occur. thanks for all the work that you put into these lessons.

jimmyb
jimmyb(@jimmyb)
2 years ago

Devin’s CGO coarse is probably one of the Best out there He explains everything so you can understand.
I’ve learned more in a short time than all the others I’ve taken.
Thankyou Devin

Jolie Byrd
Jolie Byrd(@jolie)
1 year ago

Thank you so much for what you’re teaching! It’s definitely been most helpful. I’ve recommended your site to several different people.
I play rhythm for my family’s bluegrass/gospel band but really want to take lead guitar breaks.
Your site is definitely helping me head in that direction.
Thanks again!

george whiteside
george whiteside(@devilnthedetails)
6 months ago

I was cruising right along until I got to this lesson, lol. I kept on with the following lessons for a while but I’ve come back to this one and listened to it over and over working to understand and follow every element. For a beginner like me, this is a huge step and I want to have the kind of dexterity with finger picking that I see seasoned musicians like you have. I am getting glimpses of this transition coming. Compared to basic rhythm guitar, timing and vocals, learning scales and learning how to apply the timing and rhythm… Read more »