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Larry

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  • in reply to: Don't Look for Me by Jeffrey Foucault #2048481
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    Larry
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    I followed your link to youtube and it lead me to another Bryan Sutton song–him doing Doc Watson’s version of Streamlined Cannonball. Try to keep your feet still during that!

  • in reply to: Pick stroke direction #2042239
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    Larry
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    Devin,

    Thanks for that advice. I went back and practiced that style on the A part of Gold Rush and it has helped a lot. Once I got used to doing it that style, I started putting the hammers and pull-offs back in and try to remember that the next pick stoke will be in the same direction as the hammer or pull. It’s not completely muscle memory yet, but it’s getting better. Again, thanks.

  • in reply to: No Key of B? #2042235
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    Larry
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    You could probably figure out a scale for the key of B and it would be helpful as far as playing single notes. But playing chords in that key would involve playing B-C#-D#-E-F#-G#-A#, with B-G#-A# being the dominant chords in that key. You could do it, and probably be a better guitar player, but it in my not-so-very-experienced opinion, it’s a helluva lot easier to capo at the 4th fret and play G-C- and D. Those chords will also give you a more traditional sound to the song. Just my opinion.

  • in reply to: Pick stroke direction #2041695
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    Larry
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    Devin,

    Thanks for your suggestions and I will try them. I don’t know if I might be making too big a deal out of this, but it has been really frustrating for me. It really comes into play when I try to play an up-tempo tune (like Gold Rush) faster without looking at the tab’s pick stroke directions. It doesn’t seem to be as big a deal on, say, your version of Bill Cheatham, which also has a lot of hammers and pull-offs, but has a slower flow. (And thank goodness for your version of Old Grimes!)

    BTW, I’ve have seen that video of Molly Tuttle. She plays so fast that I don’t know if the looper slow it down enough to do me any good. :). I did take something from it though. After I watched it, I started cupping my picking hand into a loose fist when I play and it seems to work for me.

    Again, thanks Devin.

    Larry

     

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 1 week ago by Avatar Larry.
  • in reply to: Playing pretty #2040436
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    Larry
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    Daniel, I’m probably not the right person to try and answer this as I’m sort of a beginner, but I think you answered your own question. I would say, yes, it’s putting in the time, drills, and practicing scales slowly and precisely. I would also say that maybe playing shouldn’t become so focused on learning all the time that it stops being as much fun. Get out and either play or listen to other guitar players. After you’ve played for a while it gets easier to pick up on what others are doing and to incorporate it into your playing.

    It’s frustrating and, believe me, I have the same issue as you. My stuff doesn’t sound as good as Devin’s, or as “pretty” even when I play it note for note with the tablature. I am getting a little better though, and that keeps me going. I’m working hard on getting my pick stroke direction right and am hoping my speed will eventually increase. In the meantime, I’ll put the tabs down sometimes and just play the guitar. Out of that have come some pleasant discoveries.

     

  • in reply to: Acoustic Guitar Setup #1534006
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    Larry
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    If you’re talking about your guitar’s action (the height of the strings off  the fingerboard) it can be lowered or raised. I’d take it to a guitar shop with a good repair guy or girl 🙂 and ask them.

  • in reply to: Pentatonic Scales #1533609
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    Larry
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    Thanks Devin.

  • in reply to: G Run #1533156
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    Larry
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    If you use that link, you’ll have to copy/paste the whole thing to get to the page.

  • in reply to: G Run #1533155
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    Larry
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    There are probably a lot of people on here who can answer this a lot better than me, but I’ll try. Yes, it’s a lick to end a phrase and begin a new one. If you’ve listened to bluegrass music, you’ve probably heard it a zillion times and didn’t realize it. I’m sure Devin has a lesson on this site that shows it and you’ll be able to find several videos on YouTube. Like I said, others can explain it better, but I hope this helps some.

    https://video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrEeBm9hcdbHxkAlTcPxQt.;_ylu=X3oDMTByMjB0aG5zBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzYw–?p=what+is+a+guitar+g+run+bluegrass&fr=yhs-pty-pty_converter&hspart=pty&hsimp=yhs-pty_converter#id=1&vid=51b934cf43406af3fe2ac2becb5ade16&action=view

     

  • in reply to: Favourite guitar pickers #1033060
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    Larry
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    I think Brad Davis is an awesome guitar player who kinda flies under the radar because he doesn’t release a lot of his own records. In my opinion he can get a little carried away with all his embellishments (which  are still amazing), but when he stays close to the melody he’s way up their on my list.

  • in reply to: Lesson Requests #1032896
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    Larry
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    Neat thread. Interesting to see where other members are coming from musically. I’d love to see Devin work out Billy Grey by Norman Blake and also Rock, Salt and Nails, but the Hot Mud Family’s version. This was a very, very good and underrated Southern Ohio band back in my day — the mid-70s. Their harmonies were just tight. Their version is my favorite version of this song, followed closely by JD Crowe’s with Tony Rice playing guitar.

  • in reply to: Favourite guitar pickers #1032890
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    Larry
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    Justin, I love Doc, too. But I think my all-time favorite is Norman Blake. His stuff is so unadorned that when I listen to it, I almost feel I could play it. I can’t, but it does feel that way. My favorite of today’s players is Bryan Sutton, but when I hear him, I feel like I ought to put my guitar back in the case and stick it in the closet.

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